Things Unseen

You might have heard the stories about how and where Steve Jobs got his design sense and his obsessive attention to detail. Steve’s father Paul Jobs was a good  mechanic with (from his son’s perspective) a decent sense of design. He worked with cars, metal and wood and could build most anything his family needed. Jobs said that his father cared about how things looked, but he cared even more about how the things that were hidden from plain sight looked also. He would never put a flimsy section of plywood on the back of a fine piece of furniture. He would build the back of a fence with the same care that went into the front of that same fence. He cared about the things that were unseen.

Jobs carried that aesthetic into his own work at Apple. He would have rough seams on plastic computer cases sanded and polished. He rejected components that were not precisely made. He wanted employees to sign the inside of some of the computers they made, even though the buyers of those machines would never see the signatures. This was to get them to own and be proud of the quality of the work they were doing.

Today, many of us are working from home. We have set up office space with desks, computers, lights, printers and screens by which we can interview, assess, meet with and deliver services to our patients, customers and coworkers. We spend many hours in front of a glowing screen that is anywhere from five inches to three feet or more across. We are highly visible to the people we work for and with, except for one small detail: the part of us that is unseen.

We are working from the waist, or the mid-chest, up.

I have had several people, when finding out that I do telemedicine from home or office for ninety five per cent of my work nowadays say things like, “Cool! You can go to work in shorts or pajama bottoms or sweatpants! You don’t even have to wear shoes. You can work barefoot!” Yes, that would technically be an option I suppose. Like a television anchorman, you would know what kind of shirt I am partial to (cotton Oxford button down), what kind of ties I wear on the job (NONE!), and possibly a little bit about my taste in jewelry and watches (currently wedding band, Medical College of Georgia senior ring class of 1983, and Apple Watch Series 5 WiFi and cellular capable).

Like Steve Jobs, I believe that the things that are unseen are just as important as those that are. The rest of my working clothes get me into the right frame and state of mind to listen carefully, think clearly and act decisively. You may not see them, but I know I am wearing them everyday, and that makes me feel prepared and ready for whatever the day brings. A nice pair of year round wool slacks, a Hugo Boss or Hanks leather belt, a Bellroy wallet, nice socks from Vermont or (if I’m feeling a little more dressy some mornings) a little mill on the banks of a river in England, and one of my several pairs of Samuel Hubbard shoes. (I am often up and down and on my feet for up to eighteen hours in a day, and I have very unforgiving feet).

So, could I trudge upstairs with a nice fresh Oxford shirt over a pair of khaki shorts and flip flops? Yep, I most certainly could, and no one would ever be the wiser.

Except I don’t. I’m channeling my inner Steve Jobs.

And now, you know.