Mentors

My six year old granddaughter was getting frustrated. It was very hot as we played a round of nine holes of miniature golf under the blazing sunshine at Topgolf, the first such round for her. She was doing quite well, all things considered, until we hit one of those holes that required a tricky shot into one of two small holes at the end of a log which then allowed the ball to roll downward to the green and cup below. She lined up, struck her pink ball up the gentle incline, and down it rolled again. When she was finally close enough to attack the shot through the log, she stood with feet pointing in two different directions, putter head at a strange angle and an aim that was obviously going to send the ball upwards to ricochet back toward her and perhaps down the hill again. Golf that only Sisyphus could appreciate.

I approached her and gently asked that she let me help her with her stance, club alignment and swing. “No! I can do it myself! I want to do it myself!” I tried to remain calm but finally said, “No, you can’t, and I would like to show you what might make it easier for you to get this ball in that hole and down to the green.” After a little more bluster and vague noises of discontent, she allowed me to guide her hands. After a couple more tries, the ball entered the log, came out the other end as expected and a stroke or two later she had successfully completed the hole.

We all need a little help at times. There are things that we have never learned to do, things that we have learned to do incorrectly and things that simply require learning skills that we do not yet possess due to age, or training, or experience. As a young medical student, I remember thinking that I knew more things about more things than I had ever known in my entire life, but also having a vague inkling that most of this knowledge was absolutely useless without primary experience and the guiding wisdom of teachers that had my best interest at heart. Like my granddaughter, I wanted to cry out, “I can do this myself! I want to do it myself!” Fortunately for me, I was surrounded by learned men and women who were patient, skilled and who wanted to teach me how to be a doctor, an excellent doctor. I listened to most of them (I think!) and am the better for it every day of my working life now.

Over the last couple of years, I have lost several of those mentors. Some were ill and died too soon. Some were old and it was just their time to pass the baton along to my generation. One taught me general medicine mixed with psychiatric consultation, one taught me rheumatology, and one taught me how to approach problems in medical ethics, still one my all time favorite courses in any of the schools I have attended in my lifetime. I was shaped by these teachers, in ways that not even they fully knew, and they will always be a part of me and the way I approach medicine and patients who need my expertise. They not only taught me the facts, but how to think about the facts, and then how to take that thinking one step further and formulate a viable plan that would help my patient recover from whatever ailment they presented with. There are still times that I cannot do it all by myself, and I turn to those who can help when help is needed.

We are still battling the coronavirus pandemic, like it or not. As we have discussed here in several previous columns, this illness has lead to both physical and mental illness in thousands of people. It has cost hundreds of thousands of lives. In this fight to better understand this illness, to learn how to treat it and to save lives, we have desperately needed mentors who could guide us in our endeavors. Whether it has been the pure science of the vaccines, the protocols involving ICUs and ventilators in acute care hospitals, or mental health and substance abuse issues we have sorely needed words of wisdom and tested treatment measures. Unfortunately for us, this is the first such pandemic in one hundred years, and no one alive has been able to act as such a mentor.

Now, we are at a crossroads where science and facts learned over the last eighteen months are in juxtaposition to fears, misinformation and rigid dogma. We must, like it or not, allow someone to come in and guide our hands. We need those with facts and tests and procedures that will help us to beat this illness modify our grip on our own fears, align us with solid scientific facts, and insure that our steady and confident swing is complemented by a fluid and smooth follow through. We need the mentors that this crisis has created in real time. Like my granddaughter, we can learn to make the shot, but we cannot do it alone.