Janus Moments

Janus, according to ancient Roman mythology and religion, was a god with two faces. Purportedly, he could look toward the future as well as back to the past. When we think of him, we might think of someone who is “two-faced”, one who talks out of both sides of his mouth, one who cannot be trusted. We have many examples of people who behave in this way today. Just pick up a newspaper, sign on to your favorite news outlet, or turn on the television. Say one thing, act in the opposite way. Promise one thing, deliver another (or nothing at all). Smile at someone while stabbing them in the back. “Make something great again” by tearing it down. (that works well in medical school and boot camp, but other than that I’m not sure it’s a good way to run a railroad, if you get my drift)

Janus was a two faced god, for sure, but he was more than that. He was considered the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways, passages and endings. I am so sick of seeing and hearing and experiencing modern people and circumstances that do little more than belittle, tear down, marginalize and destroy government, institutions, morals and other people. Could we not look at Janus as a chance for looking back at history, learning from it, and then facing the future with a bright optimism that fuels positive change and enlightenment and respect for others? How many Janus moments could we find, if we could but look for them actively?

  1. New relationships. We meet people all the time, in the stores we frequent, at our places of worship, at work, at school, at play. New relationships are just that-new. They are opportunities to show compassion and friendship to others, while receiving the same from them and learning new things from them as well. While we have many fine older relationships that span years and even decades, new ones offer us the opportunity to  expand our worldview, our reach and our circle of influence for the better.
  2. Online encounters. We sign onto Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, WeChat, and dozens of other on-line clearing houses for ideas, self-expression and commentary. We pick and choose who to associate with there just as we do IRL (in real life). We look, listen and learn. We comment about the things that we feel most strongly about. It is a slippery slope, social media. Why? Anonymity is one big reason. You can say anything to anybody with impunity, to a point. You can cut someone down, cut them off, and cut them out of the herd. You can spew racist commentary, spout your political views and wish someone a happy fifth birthday, all on the same medium. Is this not the perfect place to model behavior, good behavior for others? Yet, we look backwards to arguments and wars and disagreements from the past, fanning the flames of hate and unrest that we thought had long since died down to a heap of cold ashes. We spew vitriol. We curse others. We demean others for their customs, their dress, their sexual orientation, their religious beliefs. It seems that social media is rarely the bringer of good tidings and happiness, as least on the whole. Where better to turn things around and use this Janus moment to look forward, literally turning our backs on hate and racism and homophobia and discrimination and fear?
  3. Death and loss. I was reading several articles this past week about D Day and its aftermath. On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 allied troops made a spectacular beach assault on the German defenses on the coast of France. The attack involved incredible planning, unbelievable numbers of planes, trucks, amphibious assault vehicles, and of course the soldiers themselves. Nine thousand allied soldiers were killed or wounded that bloody day, but their sacrifices allowed one hundred thousand more troops to begin the march inland that eventually lead to Hitler’s downfall and the salvation of Europe and democracy in the free world. We mourned their sacrifices and their loss this past week, as we do and as we should every year, but is this also a Janus moment? I believe what I am thinking about this was best said by General George S. Patton. “It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.”
  4. Aging: In another blog, I am writing out my feelings and coming to terms with Growing Older. Aging is that perfect mix of looking back and looking forward, never in equal parts. When we get up in the morning and have our increasing aches and pains and feel stiff and sore and tired, we look back at how young and spry we once were, and we grieve just a little. We have inevitably lost our physical youth. Ah, but what have we gained? As our physical bodies age and change, as they must, our minds are filled with memories and thoughts and ideas processed and lessons learned.  We have lived. No matter if our life spans ten years, fifty years or a hundred years, we have lived. That counts.
  5. Transitions. We all go through those times in life when things change. We graduate kindergarten and move to the first grade-real school! We finish high school and decide to go to college-or not. We get our first job and begin to pay our own way in the world. We pick a life partner. We have children. We lose a parent, We move to a new city. Transitions are those perfect Janus moments that let us say goodbye while looking ahead. We mourn the loss of certainty, yet we eagerly anticipate the joy of discovery. We are in one of those global times of transition in our country right now, on many levels. We are deciding who should be insured and have healthcare. We are deciding if women control their own bodies. We are deciding who can love who can marry. We are deciding how we fit into the world economy and the culture of man.

Like Janus, we look forward to these transitions as we walk through the gate of history. We anticipate the future. We want it to be bright for everyone.

Also like the god of doorways, passages and time, we look back at the past with some nostalgia, sense of sadness and loss. This is normal and should be embraced.

However, we turn our back on and ignore the lessons of the past, the signposts left by those who have gone before, at our peril.

 

 

Blackjack

It’s been twenty-one years. 

Twenty-one years since I looked at the x-rays, white as a blizzard.

…beep, beep, beep, beep…

Whiteout. 

Washed in the blood of the Lamb. 

Looking at blood in all the wrong places. 

Twenty-one years and the image of my mother, sitting in the corner of the room. 

Resigned, not resolute.

…beep, beep, beep…

Limbo. 

Deal another card. 

…beep, beep…

The Decision.

Stop it all, all but the necessary (and what was necessary at that point anyway?).

Deal another card. 

It’s okay, Dad, you can go now. It’s okay.

Death is never okay. 

Deal another card.

…beep…

Is he here?

Is He here?

Is He in heaven?

Is he in heaven?

Do you want one more card?

Hit me

Nothing is permanent.

Time is precious.

Love means everything.

Blessed be the tie that binds, our hearts in Christian love.

When we asunder part, it gives us inward pain

But we shall still be joined in heart, and hope to meet again. 

Hit me.

…………..beeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep…………………..

The house always wins.

Wailing

 

Image

I was dressed, had my briefcase in hand and was ready to walk out the door of my apartment. I heard a rising and swelling and eerie sound coming from outside the door. One of those directionless, piercing, annoying, frightening sounds that makes you wonder if someone is hurt, in pain, being attacked or just kidding someone by uttering disturbing sounds for sport. At seven thirty in the morning, it just sounds odd and oddly  unnerving. 

I opened the door, stepped out and immediately startled a youngish Hispanic woman who was walking by. 

“Are you all right? I’m sorry. I…” I began, trying to lock my door and apologize to her at the same time.

“Yes, yes,” she stammered, her eyes softening almost at once when she saw that I was harmless. 

“Do you know who that is?” I asked. The wailing continued, louder now that I was outside in the common area. 

She looked back over her shoulder, toward the stairwell leading down to the next floor.

“She lost her dog, her puppy, last night. She is…she is very sad.”

“Oh, no! I am so sorry. Is someone with her?” I said, fumbling for anything that didn’t sound either trite or intrusive. I did not know this woman. 

“Yes, yes,” she nodded, a small, sad smile on her lips now. 

“Good, then, that’s good. I hope things are going to be okay for her,” I said, moving towards the opposite stairwell leading down one flight to my car. 

She walked a few steps and turned towards her own apartment door. 

The wailing continued, rising up like tendrils of smoky sound, lingering on the air, then floating away. I get gooseflesh thinking about it as I write this. Sad. Moaning. Injured. Plaintive. Wrenching. 

Grieving.

Childless

ImageApril 20, 1965.

A day like any other day, I suppose, but not for my parents. 

I was seven years old, and I remember nothing of it. Nothing at all. 

Isn’t that odd? An event that could change the dynamics of my entire family forever would not even be a part of my conscious mind as I moved forward in time every April 20th after that? Odd, but true. I don’t know exactly how it happened, how it affected my folks, how they processed it, who was there with them and for them. 

She didn’t even have a name. Infant daughter of…was all the simple gravestone says. She rests in the bright middle Georgia sunshine at my father’s feet, no doubt where she would have spent many happy hours if he’d lived longer. If she’d lived at all.

I often wonder what she would have been like. Dainty and feminine? Rough and tumble? Smart and searching? Ready to change the world? Loving, caring, feeling, giving? The apple of her older sibling’s eye, I’m sure of that. Someone to be protected by a bragging, proud brother, I’m sure. Someone to be a protector too, somehow, for a brother who even now needs a buffer between him and the big, wide, harsh world some days when it gets to be just a little too much. 

I might have done that for her. She might have done that for me. 

How sad for a gravestone to have but one date inscribed on it. One date. Birth and death all at once. No dash. 

 

Oh, I don’t know. Thank you for asking. 

Maybe because we just passed through another Memorial Day with its row upon row of white crosses and the thousands of kids that lie there, motherless in the ground. 

Maybe because of what my grandmother said to me, in her grief, as she waited, slumped over in the parlor before my father’s funeral. “It’s not right. No parent should have to outlive their own child.” 

Maybe it’s because one of my friends has been dealing with a very sick child. “She’s never been this sick.” The quietly frantic pleading and praying and busyness that goes with that, with the knowledge that you will do anything, everything in your power to make sure that child gets well and lives. There is no higher calling for a parent than to be totally focused on the need of their offspring, until whatever is assaulting them is totally annihilated. 

Maybe it’s because she came to see me the other day, wrapped in grief so raw, so tangible, so real that you could see it in the bathrobe, pajamas and house slippers she wore to my office. It didn’t matter one whit to her what she wore that day. I didn’t matter that her red, tear-stained face hadn’t seen eye shadow or rouge or powder in days, maybe weeks. None of that mattered.

She shared her grief with me. She shared what it must have been like for my own mother on April 20, 1965, and every April 20th after that-every day after that. In her brokenness, she still got out of her house, trudged the distance to my office, and tried to help me understand what she was going through. 

Like so many patient encounters, this one was good for both patient and doctor. This one showed me how very real the connection between us is, the tiny thread of communication that persists even through the darkest hours, the most blinding pain, the most raw, aching, devastating grief. I felt it, but I could not put it into words. 

I didn’t have to.

Sometimes it’s best for the doctor just to be present and say nothing. She did it for both of us. I just sat there with her, feeling it, letting her feel it, knowing that eventually, it will get better. It will never go away, no never, never, never, but it will get better. She was not convinced. 

She looked up at me and made direct eye contact once in that session, only once, and summarized her grief.

“There is no pain, I mean no pain in this world, that is worse than this pain.”

At that moment, I believed her.