Lend Me Your Ears

Okay, so I made it clear in my last post that I do not like really big, long term change. That’s just me. That being said, I have been in a maelstrom of rapid, relentless, major, workflow altering change, much as many of you have, over the last two weeks now. Sort of like that frog in the pot of water that is unaware that the temperature is rising until he starts to boil, we have been the recipients of a slowly gathering storm, pushing a tidal wave of change on us from way out at sea, knowing that it is coming but not having a clue exactly when it will hit, how much damage it will do, or whether we will survive it.

On top of that, we are now seeing reports of people actually dying from this COVID-19 infection and disease, not just getting sickened or inconvenienced by it. A young lady. A middle aged media executive, a child, an infant, a renowned neurosurgeon, a country music artist. In other words, people like us or people that we love and care about. Ouch. Much too close to home. Anxiety, More stress. Worry. Paranoia. Enforced isolation which leads to functional isolation which leads to real isolation even at home. Not good for the psyche. Not good at all.

I can handle this, I tell my bad self. I will not get sick. This could never happen to me. I’m too young to die. I’m in my prime. My brain, smart as it is in the area of fact assessment and reality testing, is also super duper good at deception. The person it is the best at deceiving is me. I do not feel sick, therefore I cannot get sick. I am able to handle this stress, and even more stress, without feeling it physically. I will not notice a thing, not one little thing that will give me a clue that maybe my physical or emotional systems are overloaded. Right.

A couple of weeks ago, my left ear started to feel a bit stuffy. Annoying, but not terribly debilitating. I chalked it up to the myriad allergens in the air in the southern United States at this time of the year. I had felt this before, sometimes saw it turn into a mild cold, and had developed a way to cruise through it. Daytime and nighttime cold medicine at the very start of this syndrome, plus nasal spray to keep me breathing enough to work and be productive, all for about a week or so, had always worked before. Dutifully, at that first little feeling of stuffiness and discomfort, I embarked on my standard regimen. I thought little more about it.

A week later, things were worse. The ear was more stopped up, I could not hear well on the left side, and there was an uncomfortable feeling of having one side of my head in a barrel. I knew best, I told me, and I continued to doggedly prosecute my tried and true regimen. More liquicaps, more spray, more time. Nothing doing, my ear said, we will not budge. The left side of my head, down onto my neck, around to my cheekbone, got numb. When I would talk to colleagues, albeit from six feet away, I felt that I was shouting. Conversations at the island in the morning with my wife were unsatisfyingly one sided unless I turned my head towards her and practiced a mixture of something like torticollis and lip reading. “This is one bad allergy season!” I pontificated. All the while, this was really starting to drive me nuts, with the changes at work, schedules upended, my wife getting back on planes to fly germs, I mean passengers, around the country.

Then I remembered an episode a few years ago when a similar thing happened, but a time that I felt that I lost ALL the hearing in the same ear. Total hearing loss. Nothing. Scary. I ended up going to an urgent care center that time, and as you may have guessed by now, I had a monster, hard, obstructive impaction of cerumen, that’s ear wax to you and me, in that ear canal, completely and utterly obliterating any path for air or sound to travel one way or the other down my ear canal. A little soaking and a splashing shower of irritation, I mean irrigation into a small metal pan, and I could hear! I had never felt that happy in my entire life.

Fast forward to this week. No hearing, numbness in my face, unsteady on my feet, oh my God do have a tumor somewhere kind of angst running amok among the COVID-19 particles , I finally remembered that episode. I go to Walgreens, buy some ear wax nuking stuff (No, they still don’t have hand sanitizer), and get to work. I won’t bore you with the tedious details, but after three nights of this intervention, one evening in the midst of a showering royal flush, out came an ugly piece of wax that had bugged me for days. I could hear! I was no longer numb! It was a miracle!

Funny thing, though, the right ear, the one that had felt pretty normal through all this, felt a little stuffy itself once the left one was crystal, drive a gondola down the ear canal clear. Oh, no, migratory aural tumor, I thought to myself, and had to smile. Really? Really? More wax nuking drops, two more days, then blessed relief. I am virtually normal now, if I ever was.

So, I quipped to my wife at breakfast the next morning, sitting at the island, and NOT turning my head as I could already hear her replies, I wonder if increased stress and anxiety can cause one to create more ear wax? Ever at the ready to end wanton ignorance in our little world, she snatched up her iPhone and searched for an answer.

I’ll be damned.

Turns out, increased stress and fear can cause the body to produce more cerumen.

WHAT?

PRODUCE MORE CERUMEN!

SEASON WITH CUMIN? WHAT?

NO! EAR WAX. EAR WAX!

Oh……

We are all overloaded right now. We are frogs in a pot. The temperature is rising, and we are in jeopardy of boiling if we are not careful. We think that we have seen it all, done it all, figured it all out because we are smart, successful, resourceful people. We have all the answers. We are large and in charge.

Wrong.

This is bigger than us. Tiny viral particles, too small for us to see, have brought our world to its knees. Our economies are reeling. Our social institutions are paralyzed. Some of us are sickened. Some of us are dying. Our bodies know this, the ancient parts of our bodies and those cells and systems that really HAVE seen it all and survived, they know this, even if our younger, smarter, more resourceful brains cannot accept it.

Listen to your body. It will tell you when you are maxing out your biological credit line. It will tell you when to slow down, when to meditate, when to eat, when to rest. If you do not heed it, it will find a way to get your attention.

Thanks for lending me an ear while I waxed eloquent.

Yes, I really went there. Be well.

COVIDISMS: Change

I don’t like change. Never have. Never will. That is, big change that impacts me in big ways for long periods of time. Little changes, maybe okay.

That being said, this COVID-19 crisis sucks.

As soon as we knew at work that this was a real disaster, that it would almost certainly affect us locally and all of our coworkers and patients, we began to plan and to act. Almost immediately, we began to scheme how to put at least six feet between us, how to open doors with door stops so that no one would have to repeatedly touch them to go in and out of the various hallways in our buildings. How to sanitize fixtures and other touchable surfaces multiple times each day to keep us safe. The physical cleaning and distancing and separations came almost naturally as a first step to keep us healthy and safe. I dealt with that okay. Wash my hands even more times than usual. Don’t cough or sneeze openly. Use Kleenex, handkerchief, sleeves. Don’t touch stuff and then touch your face. Got it.

Next came how to distance ourselves from each other while all working in the same building, and how to keep patients from coming in and out, potentially cutting down on exposures for all of us. Six feet of distance. No staff meetings. All info exchanged by email, text or other non personal ways. Screening tent set up outside, signs diverting folks coming to the property to that area for the now ubiquitous interrogatory. Injections given outside in the tent by scrubbed, bescarved, masked nursing staff. The first ever, to my knowledge, management team meeting at our place that was completely done by Skype for Business. Most of us were still in the same building, but we were not dropping by to stand in each other’s doorway to chat, we were not doing sidewalk consultations, and we were not having routine meetings in the mornings or any other time. This was a major departure from business as usual for mental health types, who are used to presenting cases, asking questions, getting feedback and working in a team model.

The next step, pressure from the governor’s office to work from home. Not just a few of us. All of us, or as many as practically possible. This meant rapidly, and I mean in a matter of days, prepping everyone to pull up stakes, take everything needed home, learn to connect with a laptop, cell phone or tablet and access all the tools that we use to do our jobs every day, but in a completely different setting with completely different hardware. In addition to that, to speak with patients by video chat or phone (video encouraged) instead of face to face. This changed in less than a week. Hard to describe in words how monumental this is for many of us, who have sat face to face with patients for decades, looking for clues from odors, mannerisms, movements, gait, speech, expressions and other ways of assessing people and their behavioral problems. Suddenly, our world jumped online. Almost totally.

There are still a few of us literally in the building. I am still doing my Telepsychiatry emergency room work at the office since I have all of my technological rig in place there to do high quality video, etc. I am not set up to do that from home. I do, however, have a new laptop that is about halfway set up to do everything I need to do to run my clinic job from home, bolstered by video access that I can get with my MacBook or iPad. I have about sixty patients scheduled for the clinic this week, so I am not sure where the time is going to come from to make these major changes in workflow while work is flowing, but it will come to pass somehow. Soon, I may be asking for permission to share my wife’s art room studio space for a makeshift office in the corner for me, my Dell, my Mac, my iPad, my iPhone and my virtual patients. Major. Major. Major. Change.

Are there changes outside work? Are you kidding me? As I settled in to do my Telepsych shift in the EDs this morning, I got a FaceTime request from my daughter in Denver. Did not have to think twice about answering it immediately. There was my granddaughter, with a smoothie popsicle breakfast in her little hands. She has been in the habit lately, according to her mother, of calling someone that she wants to check on. Today, she wanted to call her Papa. Well, melt me and wipe me up with a Quicker Picker Upper. This is radical. This is heartbreaking. This is fabulous. This makes me laugh hysterically and sob at the same time.

So. Much. Change.

Such a short time to take it all in.

Has this changed my relationship with my wife? Not fundamentally, not in the least. She is my rock, my confidant, my support when I need it most. I try to be hers and return the favor. So are we both stressed? Absolutely. I work in health care. She works in the airline industry. Enough said. Might one of us be exposed to this little particle and infect the other? Of course. Might we get sick? We’re both over sixty. Yep. Might we have to quarantine? Yep. Can she work from home? Nope. We are okay, but we have had conversations. We will have more.

How am I dealing with all of these fundamental and profound changes?

On the negative side, by obsessing way too much (I do that anyway, on a good day!), by updating, organizing, re-reading, trying to concentrate, trying to stay focused on the task at hand and actually finish it in a timely way.

On the positive side? Listening to music, lots of music, uplifting music. Listening to podcasts. Writing. Journaling. Sleeping when I can. Eating good food. Connecting with family by email text, FaceTime and phone calls. Trying my best to be supportive of my friends and my staff at work. Getting advice and help and guidance when I need it. (I still need it.) Making time for my marriage and my relationship with my wife. Noticing that it is indeed a beautiful springtime outside and marveling at the beautiful colorful flowers in our courtyard, my Japanese maple that has miraculously resurrected itself from the winter doldrums to sprout dozens of delicate red feathery leaves, and the azaleas that are shouting at us, “Look! Look! We are gorgeous! It’s spring!” Watching the doves who sit patiently on their nests at the top of the courtyard’s brick wall under a marvelous cascade of tiny yellow roses. Sitting, blinking, soft and beautiful brown-gray and wondering what all the hullabaloo is about.

I do not like change.

I do not like it in my house.

I do not like it for my spouse.

I do not like it at my work.

Out of my routine I am jerked.

I do not like this viral spread.

I do not like the many dead.

I wonder when it all will end.

I wonder if our paths will bend?

I wonder if we all will learn

That viruses our worries spurn.

They set their own trajectory

And care not one small whit for me.

How has your life changed in the last two weeks? How is it likely to change this next month? How will you cope and stay happy and healthy and productive until this pandemic ends?

Stay safe, isolate, wash your hands and we’ll get through this together.

Updates

Well, as often happens, it takes a while for the dust to settle on a new idea or project to really find out what you were thinking in the first place. I was going to have a spin off blog about growing older that would be separate from my longstanding blog Musings. I realized a couple of things. One, it is as difficult to multi-blog as it is to truly multitask. We fool ourselves into thinking that we can do it, but in reality we only find ourselves ping ponging back and forth between competing ideas and projects, half doing both, completing little and feeling frustrated. I found that as I was growing older I was simply musing, and in the time I was musing I had indeed grown older. The solution? Merge the blogs. Done. If you missed any of the first dozen and a half posts on Growing Older, they are here to be found and enjoyed. Now, back to musing, the thing that I like to do and most likely do best in this space and format anyway.

Coronavirus has changed my life. Has it changed yours too? It seems like years ago since the first inklings of this unfolding tragedy hit out consciousness, but it’s only been weeks. In just weeks my home life, work life, travel, recreational time, and professional view of the world has changed. It’s here. I don’t like it.

Specifically, what do I not like about this virus-filled world? I do not like the fact that I now am sitting at my desk, isolated, cut off from my patients, all of whom I now communicate with by cellphone or video. I do not like the fact that my wife is unnerved, unsure, and at loose ends, not knowing if she will fly, where she will fly, with whom she will fly, and if she has a better then even chance of contracting this COVID-19 and then bringing it back home. I also worry that even though I see everyone artificially and sterilely now, that I may have had a chance or three to pick up that same virus in the weeks before we even knew it was stalking us. I do not like the fact that I spent many hours thinking about and working on a presentation for a conference that is now canceled. I do not like the fact that my wife and I were planning to go to Italy in April, the first time I would have been back to that country since I lived there as a seventh grader in 1970, and now that dream is many months if not years down the road. I do not like the fact that I cannot joyfully get on a plane and fly anywhere I want to seek adventure or excitement, because each trip is possibly contaminated and scary and potentially disease-ridden. I do not like the fact that I had to physically rearrange my office to better telepsych and type and talk and Skype and document. A little thing, but enough to make me not know exactly where to put my hands and at what distance to sit from each screen and how to best situate myself to hear and see and type and complete other tasks at hand. Just enough change to make me strain at the viral tether that now is attached to all of us, invisible and inevitable.

Which part of all this makes me the most cranky, feel the most sad, the most sorry for myself? None of it.

What hurts the most about this kind of game changing, world shrinking, mind blowing natural event is how it impacts the ones I love and care about. I already mentioned my wife. What hurts her hurts me and vice versa. Her confusion and questions are mine, my physical and emotional exhaustion are hers. We support each other the best we can and keep moving forward.

Our mothers, both in their eighties, should not have to worry about this. They are the young old, at least in our eyes, energetic and sharp and happy and smiling. They enjoy Silver Sneakers, volunteering at the hospital, spending time on the back deck, tending to flowers, watching the myriad birds they attract with feeders, visiting with neighbors, seeing pictures of great-grandchildren on FaceBook and living the life that the old should be entitled to without question. They should not have to worry about a cough, some congestion, a fever.

My children. No, they are not young anymore, I know that, strange as it still seems to me. They are courageous and daring and outspoken and informed and energetic as they attack this new problem that has decided to pop up in their lives at this particular time. They must handle relationships and jobs and raising children and sending spouses off to work. They have this newfangled internet and FaceBook and Twitter and Instagram stories and all the ways they can connect to friends and family, and they wield them like flaming swords, daring this little be-crowned viral particle to deconstruct their worlds. I marvel at their energy, their drive, their curiosity, their willingness to challenge norms and speak out and change their world. Virus be damned.

Yes, all the inconveniences are just that. They are not insurmountable. They may be fleeting. They are adaptations, mild kinks in the otherwise relatively smooth rope of time that we all cling to and slide along until we reach the frayed end that allows us to quietly slip off into history.

The big things, the important things, are how this little virus is changing our social fabric, our emotional, physical and financial security, our ability to reach out and touch each other, to comfort each other, to hold each other up. It is painful to watch, to experience, to feel. It is isolating. It is depressing. It feels almost insurmountable.

But it is not forever. The wonderful line in one of the shows that my oldest daughter starred in last season in Chattanooga, Avenue Q, says it best.

It’s only for now.

Wash your hands. Pick up the phone. Call someone. Wash your hands. Telecommute if you can. Cook at home. Have wonderful conversations. Wash your hands. Do it, because you must. We must all pitch in, if not for ourselves, then for our mothers and fathers and children and grandchildren,

It’s only for now.