Taking One for the Team

Simone Biles knew that something was wrong. She had pulled herself out of the team gymnastics competition at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games after she developed a case of the twisties. This condition severely impairs a gymnast’s ability to know their position in the air and relative to the ground, something that could lead to serious injury if not addressed. She also decided not to compete in some of the individual events in the days afterward, citing mental health issues. Rather that find herself lost in the air, unable to add to her team’s scoring and possibly injuring herself, she decided to withdraw. “I knew they could do the job.” She wanted her teammates to medal, and she saw herself as a stumbling block. In an interview, she said, “We aren’t just athletes or entertainment. We are humans too. We have emotions that we don’t tell you about. I felt embarrassed at first. You have to put your mental health first. It doesn’t matter if you are on the biggest stage.”

There was mixed response to this turn of events from around the world. Some mental health advocates were very supportive of Ms. Biles. Some of her peers, such as Michael Phelps and Naomi Osaka, called her to offer their support, in that they had also struggled with mental health issues that affected their performance at times. They applauded her decision to put self care first and to keep herself safe. Others, not very sympathetic to her struggles at all, said that she should have “taken one for the team” and pushed on to compete in all the Olympic gymnastic events.

“Taking one for the team” means willingly undertaking an unpleasant task or making a personal sacrifice for the collective benefit of one’s friends or colleagues. It derives from baseball in the 1970s, when a player was asked to take a pitch on the body to get to first base for the benefit of the team.

The path that Simone Biles chose was self care.

In an October 22, 2020 Harvard Business Review article titled “Serious Leaders Need Self Care Too”, Palena Neale PhD addressed this very issue. She asked questions such as “Why are so many leaders so resistant to taking a bit of time for themselves?” She found that “it usually boils down to misperception around what good leadership is, what self care is, and how self care actually works.” One thing that is often lost is that “self care is an investment that can increase overall productivity and effectiveness as a leader.” Ms. Biles had faced similar circumstances before in her career, and I am quite sure that she expected her competitive days to go forward as well, so getting past a temporary block in her overall journey just made sense for her at that time.

Diet, exercise and sleep are three components of a healthy life that we already know about. Then why is it so hard for most of us to eat right, exercise daily and sleep enough hours? One of the answers that Dr. Neale found was “I don’t have time for that!” The feeling of constant stress to manage a busy life, perform, always be on, and to juggle too many tasks is “sadly all too common.” “Taking breaks can prevent decision fatigue, renew motivation, increase creativity and improve learning.” Could Simone Biles have accomplished all of her key priorities, including tying Shannon Miller with seven Olympic medals after coming back to win bronze on the balance beam this year, without paying attention to her health and sense of wellbeing?

Another response found by Dr. Neale was that “leaders need to be strong. If I’m a good leader, I shouldn’t need self care.” This is simply incorrect. Leaders are often taught to not show any vulnerability. They feel that they should have all the answers. I think that many medical students and newly minted doctors feel that they know everything that is to be known when they finish their training. It is only later, when one has practiced in the real world for a time, that one realizes that learning never ends, and that the correct answers are constantly changing. Leaders sometimes feel that if they do not meet these criteria that no one will follow them at all.

How do we follow the example of Simone Biles and make self care a priority in our lives? According to Dr. Neale, we should integrate self care into our daily routine. Make it your own. Make time in your agenda for self care. Experiment with different things to keep it fresh. Share with others when you have found something that works for you that you think might benefit others. After all, Simone talked with Michael, Naomi and even Oprah! Your team will see these activities and actions and resolve and will follow you. Everyone wins.

What lessons can we take from the experience of Simone Biles in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics?

First, if you see that taking one for the team will lead to injury to you or disaster for the team, then stop and reevaluate. Biles stated in an interview that “it didn’t go like I wanted it to go, but it will open doors for bigger connections”. Pause for self care when you need it. Almost everything can wait. Model your decision making and share with others what worked for you. Encourage others to follow your lead.

Come back stronger and achieve even more because instead of taking one for the team, you decided to take some much needed time for yourself.

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