Reentry

Reentry

 

 

Did you watch any of the comings and goings of the Crew Dragon capsule as it went up and down from the International Space Station? It’s a sleek, slick, dazzling white, truly space age looking piece of hardware that has now ferried several astronauts to space and back as part of the partnership between SpaceX and NASA. I decided to watch a video on the You Tube channel Everyday Astronaut to learn more about how this tiny capsule gets back to earth once it has been in space and docked for a while. I would encourage you to check it out.

 

Spoiler alert: this last mission resulted in the first successful water splashdown since 1976. That being said, what were some of the most interesting facts about the timeline and process of bringing this little capsule and its human cargo home safely to earth? First of all, once the Crew Dragon backed away from its home away from home, it had anywhere from six to thirty hours until possible splashdown. That’s quite a range! As it entered  the atmosphere of our planet, its heat shield was turned to face forward in the direction of travel, having to withstand temperatures of 1900 degrees Celsius, and G forces of three to four times earth’s for the crew inside. The air that rushes towards the speeding capsule has little time to get out of the way, is superheated to half the temperature of the surface of the sun, and is compressed into what is called plasma, all of which puts tremendous pressure on the capsule and its contents.

 

Once the capsule did make it past the blistering heat of the atmosphere and was free falling towards the water, it had to be further slowed down, first with two small parachutes that oriented it for its final descent. Then, four main parachutes partially opened, then fully opened to help the capsule gently settle onto the surface of the water. The exact timing and manner of deployment of these chutes is critical. Too fast and they simply won’t open, too slow and they will not slow the craft enough to prevent a hard landing on the water. It was picked up, placed in a “nest” on the recovery ship, and saw the extrication of astronauts who had been in space so long that they could barely negotiate one atmosphere of pressure and could barely stand without support. As the host of the Everyday Astronaut video stated, “The entire system makes reentry safe.”

 

Now, think about where we are today in this pandemic cycle, which officially started in March of last year. We are battered, bruised, tired, grieving, and so ready to re-enter our prepandemic lives. We would like to think that we can just magically return to what we did, how we acted and talked and functioned in January 2020. The truth is, just like Crew Dragon, we have been docked for over a year, in one way or another, stuck in our homes, working out of closets and bedrooms, teaching kids at the dining room table, talking to coworkers, friends and family by Zoom, emotionally weightless. Now, we are ready to suit up, get back into the capsule, back away from being forcibly tethered to pandemic life, and head for freedom. What will it take to do this? What will it cost us to get back on the ground?

 

First, just like the crew leaving the space station, we must be protected. We cannot do this alone. We must orient ourselves in the proper way so that we can face the onslaught of heat that will be coming our way in the form of social gatherings, parties, dinners, school activities, sporting events, church gatherings, and family outings. It is going to be wonderful and brutal all at the same time. Is your calendar already filling up like mine? We need a heat shield. This may come in the form of a good support system, good self care and good habits like exercise and getting enough sleep. The events and obligations, like the air that cannot get out of the way of the capsule and is compressed into super hot plasma, will rush at us so fast that all we think we can do is say yes and hang on for the ride. I would counter with the fact that if we have learned only one thing in this time of pandemic, it is that we can say no.

 

What are your parachutes? What will gently place some directional drag on your descent back into the helter skelter that was your pre-pandemic life? What will slow you just enough so that you can take your time, pick and choose your commitments and activities and interactions so that they will make you stronger, not dash you against life in a rush? Think about that now as you get vaccinated, as your mask comes off in more and more places, as you begin to hug friends and family again, and as you feel more comfortable in your own skin outside your own home.

 

Like the Crew Dragon astronauts, we will miraculously come through the fiery descent, get ourselves oriented in the right direction, gently slow things down to a manageable speed, and come out of our confinement a bit unsteady, but ready to accept the support that will get us back to our best selves for the years to come.

 

Happy reentry!

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