Cast Off

It happened too many years ago to remember now, but I still do. It was a time when we who labored in mental health could be more real, could actually connect with our patients in meaningful ways and even let our hair down from time to time and have some fun. A group of staff members were playing a group of patients in a friendly softball game in Aiken, a few miles from the mental health center. I was old enough to know better but still young enough to think that the teen athlete still lived in me, and you know how that always turns out.

 

I was taking my turn at bat, connected with the ball and drilled what should have been a solid single to right field. I should have been more than satisfied with that, but of course I wasn’t. I rounded first, saw that the outfielder was fumbling with the transfer from glove to throwing hand, and made a split second decision to stretch a sure single into a maybe double. Getting to second was easy. I was still moderately fast in those days. The next decision I made was not a good one, however. Without a clear need to do so, I decided to slide into second in a blaze of dusty glory. Bad move.

 

I knew that I had really screwed up when my left leg made contact with the base, which felt at that moment like a concrete block. The snap was audible, the pain immediate and the shame followed close behind. When I tried to get up, I saw an acute angle between leg and foot that was not at all natural. Not good. A short ride and check in at the emergency room later, I was not at all comforted by the well meaning nurse who told me that “only really active people get injuries like these”. You know the drill. Ortho tech, clean it up, put it in a cast to the knee, get fitted for crutches, see ya in a few weeks.

 

The hardest part about being in a cast for those long weeks, besides not being able to take a real shower without wrapping my leg in plastic bags? I couldn’t walk with crutches and carry a coffee cup at the same time. This, my friends, is the definition of crisis. But, of course, like many weekend warriors, I made it through.

 

Fast forward to the doc’s office on the day that the cast was coming off. I had lost about half the muscle mass in my leg, and I was more than a little worried about taking away the plaster exoskeleton that had held me up for those weeks. Would I fall down? Rebreak the leg? Be able to do the things that I could before the injury? Getting the cast off felt so good in one way, with cool air on skin and mobility that I had missed terribly. But the worry about reinjury or weakness or worse still gave me fits for a few days, until I knew things would be okay again.

 

Now, forward to March 13, 2021. The CDC decides that after more than a year, those who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can shed their masks indoors and out, around people who are also fully vaccinated and those who are not. This seems to come so suddenly that it catches us off guard.  After being so careful for so long to avoid exposure, protect ourselves against infection and illness, we are now told that all is clear and safe! To me, it almost instantly brought back memories of taking my cast off, something that I was more than happy to shed, but with the anxiety of what my health would be like after it was gone.

 

Protections, even if restrictive and painful in the short term, often make us feel safer in the long run. Removal of these restrictions is exhilarating but can be frightening at the same time.

 

When I was recovering from my broken leg, just as we are now seeing the beginning of the end of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, letting protections fall away was the only sure way to test ourselves and our safety going forward.

 

The second half of that lesson is also clear: testing ourselves is the only way to grow.

3 thoughts on “Cast Off

  1. Doc- Thanks for your ongoing support/advice- always on the mark! Taken together, they help with the delimna facing many of us now, in
    particular those in my “senior” age group. We must make the effort to remove the cast and
    venture on- largely a mental barrier the pandemic has put upon many of us, but we should proceed slowly, in stages if necessary. I personally believe pre-pandemic life was far too frenetic and am going to do my best to resist a return to “full-tilt freneticsm” wherever, whenever possible. But that’s a somewhat moribund 73 talking! Best Always, Rob

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  2. Rob, good to hear from you! I agree completely with your assessment that we should not return to “full-tilt freneticism” (Love that term!). If the pandemic has taught us anything, it is to stop and smell the roses.

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