COVIDISMS: There’s Got to Be a Morning After

Well, it’s been six months since this hell began for most of us. Life changed about mid-March. The pressures of pandemic life and racial unrest and climate change and monster storms and COVID-19 and political upheaval and all the rest of the plagues that currently beset us are almost too much to bear. Almost. But bear them we do, baring our souls when we need to, our teeth when we must and our hearts, always. As Master Yoda wisely taught us, in times like these, “No! Try not. DO or DO NOT. There is no try.”

Yesterday was the nineteenth anniversary of the brutal terrorist attacks on our country on September 11, 2001. Like many of you, I can remember the exact spot I was sitting in, the exact thing I was doing, the exact sameness of that morning, until someone told us to step into the next room. A group of caregivers, patients, doctors, counselors and family members were glued to the small television on top of the rolling cart, watching in disbelief as a plane hit the World Trade Center. A tragedy. A fluke. An accident. Until it wasn’t. Until another plane took that elegant, sweeping, graceful arc of death into the second tower in a ball of fire and melted glass and metal and a second plane full of people lost their lives in an instant. I listened to some of the phone calls from the planes and the towers last night, against my better judgment, and was absolutely devastated by the sadness, the finality and loss of it all. Lives and families shattered, a city reeling, responders who had been trained to handle anything that could ever happen, except this one thing. No one had ever used planeloads of people as weapons of war. I know that it is not good for me to watch and listen to histories of tragedies such as 9-11 after long weeks of work and stress, especially when I am home alone, but how can I not? How can we not hearken back to that time, that era, that innocence lost for us and for our children? NEVER FORGET.

Today is September 12th, and the thirty sixth birthday of a woman who I admire greatly. (Happy birthday, Greer. I love you!) My oldest daughter, who bears the Scotch feminine form of my first name as her own, has become a force to be reckoned with. (From Houseofnames.com: The old Scottish-Dalriadan name Greer is derived from the given name Gregor. The personal name Gregor, which is the Scottish form of Gregory, is derived from the Latin name “Gregorius” and from the Late Greek name “Gregorios,” which mean alert, watchful, or vigilant.) She is a daughter, a wife, a mother, a friend, a political activist, a party planner extraordinaire, a home schooler, a sister, and aunt and so many other things large and small. As I have written about before, she was performing in a production of Oklahoma! in Augusta, Georgia when 9-11 happened, and was about to celebrate her birthday with friends and family that year. I am quite sure that she has vivid memories of that year as we all do. There was a morning after for Greer, a birthday morning after, and there have been September 12ths every day since that fateful attack. Birthdays must be celebrated, even as losses must be mourned.

My wife has worked for Delta Airlines for forty years. She is very good at her job. She is a people person, remembers details that are lost on most mortals, and can anticipate things that others need before they know they need them. I know, because she does this for me at home all the time. Every time that I see she has left the coffee pot ready to brew the morning coffee for me the day after she leaves for a flight, or manages to fit one more container of that German shower gel I like into her bag on the way home from Frankfurt or fills up the fridge with just the soft drink that I have been craving this week or any number of things, I feel the love that she shows through her actions every day. She has gone back to flying after a voluntary two month furlough. Delta’s business plummeted ninety percent when this pandemic started, and some of her flights have less then three dozen people on them even now. The airline industry will survive, Delta will go on serving the transportation needs of many, but it’s going to be slow going. Some estimates say that the industry as a whole will not be anywhere near back to prepandemic levels of business for four to five years. In this time of COVID-19, political unrest, and commemorations of 9-11, do I worry about her as she flies from Atlanta to Amsterdam to Frankfurt to London to Dublin to Seoul and back again. I would obviously be a liar if I said I didn’t. We don’t dwell on it. It’s her job, it’s been her job for forty years, and she’ll keep doing it for another half dozen or so years and then retire. That is the plan. I believe in the plan. We simply cannot live our lives in fear of terrorists, viruses and world political unrest. We cannot, and we will not.

One cannot be a writer of any kind without reading.

(“Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.”
― Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft)

To write, you must get out in the world and experience things that compel you to write and you must read. A lot. Widely. As I age, I find that for some reason my mind takes in the written word better in an audio format than it does by holding physical books or magazines or papers in my hands. Now, I still have stacks of books and reports and papers in every single physical space that I occupy in this life, from the living room to the bedroom to my home office upstairs to my office at the clinic. I pare these down excruciatingly slowly most of the time, and I severely chastise myself regularly for not being more diligent in doing so. Be that as it may, I have loved audiobooks since a physician colleague of mine turned me on to those long cardboard boxes of cassettes that got shipped to me regularly and that I would play in the car on my daily commutes starting back in the eighties. Now, of course, having passed through the cassette and CD phases, the industry is almost purely digital and portable and held conveniently in your phone, computer or tablet. I love this, in that I always have a book or essay or article at hand and there is little excuse for lack of time to read. What do I read? I love political books lately, given our collective angst in that sphere, as well as biographies, novels, and histories. Some of the titles I have enjoyed this year include Me, by Elton John; Leonardo da Vinci, by Walter Isaacson; A Very Stable Genius, by Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig; You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington, by Alexis Coe; The Hardest Job in the World, by John Dickerson; Blindness, by Jose Saramago; and Front Row at the Trump Show, by Jonathan Karl. I am currently listening to The Second Mountain, by David Brooks. I also listen to podcasts, mostly on politics, but sometimes on other topics, on a daily basis. The pandemic has caused me to really sit down and evaluate how I use my time, every day, and the results have been eye opening. We waste a lot of time on things that, to use a football metaphor since it is finally fall, do not move the ball down the field. I am trying to rectify that in my own life.

It is Saturday morning as I write this, and football is starting back. I love football, but somehow this year I’m just not feeling it the same way, you know? Life is moving on, and time with it, and traditions and markers too, but things are different. Time will tell if we get back to normal, pre-pandemic normal, ever. One thing I am sure of is that life will go on. We will continue to live and love and work in some fashion, there will be babies born and some of us will die. As my wife and I have been learning by listening to The Great Influenza, by John M. Barry, things are bad now, but they could be orders of magnitude worse. All pandemics end, and the world will continue to turn.

A last thought. There were some good things about the seventies. This song was one of them that pertains to us now, more than ever.

Enjoy your weekend, and thanks as always for reading my Musings.

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