D Day + 1+ 51

My father died on D Day +1 + 51 years.

It was only fifty three days until he would have celebrated his sixty third birthday.

As many of you know, I have been thinking and writing about his death on and off for years, here and elsewhere. The thought that I might one day outlive my father has never been far from the front of my mind.

Well, tomorrow is the day. Today, September 2nd, is fifty three days from my sixty third birthday.

If I wake up tomorrow, as I certainly plan to do, I will have seen one more sunrise in my life than my father. I will have one more day to live, to love, to work, to play and to think about what is and what might have been, than he had.

What if today had been the last day of my life? I worked at home today seeing patients, as I have been doing for the last half year. I chatted with people by cell phone and on video calls, listening to them and trying to be helpful in the midst of the worst public heath crisis in a hundred years. I electronically prescribed medications that I sincerely hope will help alleviate suffering. I asked after one of my new employees to see how she was doing. At lunchtime I listened to a book about politics, as one does during a presidential election year. After work I took an intense forty five minute bike ride in my neighborhood and along the river with the heat index 106 degrees. I was hot, winded, and soaked at the end of it. It felt good. I felt alive. I missed my wife today, as I always do when she is away on work flights. She sent me a beautiful picture of Germany today, where the temperature and the pandemic are cooler than here in the US. I took delivery of a wonderful set of pastels that she wanted to order for her birthday, which is this Friday. (No, it is not a surprise. One of the pleasures of getting older and having most everything you need is that you can special order your gifts with no shame at all!) I smiled when I saw the box, anticipating the pure joy that these little sticks of color will give her when she holds them in her hand and applies the pigment to the special papers she will use in her art room upstairs.

Did I do enough today? Did I care enough today? Did I get outside my own head, lay aside my own anxieties and worries and needs enough to give of myself to others in a way that would have made my father proud today? Did I learn something new? Did I grow emotionally, spiritually? Did I question my own motives today, vowing to have purer ones if I am given one more tomorrow? Did I care for my physical health? Did I take care of myself in the same way that I am always asking my patients to take care of themselves?  Did I have a good day today, a day that could have been, that could be,  my last?

My wife is convinced and has ordained that I will live until I am  ninety six years old. The odds, not to mention my family genetics, do not support that wish I’m afraid, but I do love to hear her say it. I would love to live ten, twenty, even thirty more years if God grants me that special privilege. There is a lot I want to do. There is a lot I want to experience. There is a lot I want to learn.

Tomorrow, I will have lived one day longer than my father. An accomplishment? No, not at all. A gift. A true gift. A pleasure. A reminder that we are not promised one more day, but that we are allowed over and over again to take possession of that most precious of commodities and choose to use it in any way we wish. We are given the gift of time.

I will wake up tomorrow morning and rejoice in every small muscle twinge, every sleepy yawn, every hunger pang, every emotional surge, every cognitive challenge and every warm sunbeam that graces my aging face. I will rejoice in another day and the simple fact that it has been gifted to me.

Besides, what is my other option? If I die tonight and make it to heaven by morning, I would be greeted by my father, a man who preceded me in death by decades but who would be exactly my age. Somehow, I don’t think even God would find that amusing.

 

Death is nothing at all,
I have only slipped into the next room
I am I and you are you
Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.
Call me by my old familiar name,
Speak to me in the easy way which you always used
Put no difference in your tone,
Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow
Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes we enjoyed together.
Play, smile, think of me, pray for me.
Let my name be ever the household world that it always was,
Let it be spoken without effect, without the trace of shadow on it.
Life means all that it ever meant.
It it the same as it ever was, there is unbroken continuity.
Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight?
I am waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near,
Just around the corner.
All is well. ”

Henry Scott Holland

One thought on “D Day + 1+ 51

  1. Pure beauty in your words. I love who you are & how you think & that I too receive the gift of your tomorrows here on earth.

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