Slow Hand

I did some continuing education this week, the old-fashioned way. I inadvertently signed up for both digital and CD forms of my CME programs from the provider the last time I renewed, and this week’s program arrived as a plastic CD in a paper mailer. Talk about a blast from the past! I have not listened to CDs for this type of education for several years now. I decided that I would use the CD in the car on the way to work, which was just fine.

Now, after one is finished listening to the program, one must complete a post test that is graded for credit. I am also used to doing these online, answering the questions quickly, hitting send and seeing instant feedback of scores and documentation of the completed course. As this particular program was not even showing up on-line yet, I had to (gasp) study the written summary of the material and then (double gasp) take the test on a sheet of paper, filling in those little answer bubbles. Remember those? Then I could either fax the completed form or mail it back the old-fashioned way.(I faxed it)

This whole process, one that I had not used in years, felt awkward, slow and cumbersome. I found myself flashing back to the first time I took my shiny new iPad in the car and FORGOT my beloved iPhone at the house. Both times, I felt like I was cheating on my previous technology.

The positives to this retro CME experience?

It slowed me down. Big time. After listening to the program on the CD, I already had a printed copy of the notes and references for the lectures, whereas before I would have to make the effort to print a copy myself if I did not want to simply read it on my screen. I actually looked some things up, read and re-read them, and could go back and use this printed material to research my answers to the questions.

I was more focused on listening to the program and actually thinking about it somehow.

The testing process felt much more deliberate with the answer sheet and its little bubbles waiting for me to fill them.

Doing this again helped me to think back and remember what learning used to feel like before the age of the internet, podcasts, video lectures, audiobooks and TED talks.

It was not altogether a bad experience.

Which way is better for me personally?

Well, like Marty McFly, I don’t mind going back to a skateboard every once in a while as long as there is a flying DeLorean waiting to take me back home to my waiting Toyota Hilux 4X4 in the garage.

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