Earbola

It took a day or two and maybe eight hundred miles for it to fade. Each Maroon Five song or MacOSKen podcast I listened to helped to deaden the aural assault. The sounds were soothing, calming, comforting.

Starting on Friday, October 3rd, I slowly but surely began to unplug from two dozen emergency rooms in South Carolina. I checked out of two clinics. I stonewalled and diverted work email. I shut down voicemail. I left the pile of professional reading at home. I pledged to not care about the news, to disengage in a very meaningful, positive, mindful way. The noise was fading.

I started the biggest vacation of my life (so far).

I was going to focus on fun, on leisure time, on sports, on photography, on sightseeing. I was going to meet and greet family, old friends and brand new friends.

I was going to have quiet, peaceful days on the road.

Then, Ebola happened.

There was a media frenzy. Healthcare media. Mainstream media. Fox News. CNN. Sanjay pouring chocolate sauce on his inadequate suit.

I wasn’t going to watch it or listen to it or read about it. Then, I would go to the gym and there it was. I would sit in the breakfast area and there it was. I would reach for a paper and there it was.

Texas hospitals. The embattled CDC. Doctors without borders. Nurses without supporters.

Patient death from Ebola in the United States.

Controlled panic.

There began a crescendoing cacophony of cultural conversational criticism the likes of which we haven’t seen since I taught mental health hospital workers how to roll a condom onto a banana in the early nineteen eighties.

I might have have been in the middle of a seven thousand mile driving trip around the country, but the country was in the middle of a bloody medical meltdown.

I’m home. I’ve got week one back at work under my belt and have just started week two. I’m getting several Ebola related emails each day. I’ve learned, or relearned I guess, that the world doesn’t stop spinning, stop changing and stop evolving just because you’d like it to join you on a break.

Our degree of attention, focus and investment in what is going on around us may vary, and vary significantly.

The world still goes on. Loudly. Relentlessly.

I would recommend that all of you unplug every once in a while, whether it’s for a three day weekend or an African safari. Disconnecting and recharging your batteries is good for you physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.

Just remember that when you plug back in, turn the volume down just a bit. The world is also a very noisy place, and it will take time to acclimate to all the chatter again.

None of us wants to be a victim of Earbola.

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5 thoughts on “Earbola

  1. Why were you teaching mental health workers how to put condoms on banana’s? Did they have some special “need to know”? Last time I checked that wasn’t a job requirement!! I am a R.N. so found this somewhat quizzical.

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  2. Greg–That makes sense,but as someone who hasn’t worked in a state mental health system–was this for the health workers personal knowledge or so they could teach the patients??

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